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Julian – chock full of history

Hosking's Ranch, blessing box, badgers, Brian Kenner, Tom Nickel, volunteer fire dept., Mike Julian, windmills, logging, drought, Cauzza dairymen, orchards, poachers, Chariot Canyon Massacre

Julian Pie Company gets its apples from Crown Orchards in the Farmer's Road area north of town.
  • Julian Pie Company gets its apples from Crown Orchards in the Farmer's Road area north of town.
  • Image by Joe Klein
  • Appellate court turns back Hosking's fake cattle ranch

  • Inhabitants of Julian who oppose the development of 1416 acres of local back country have a newfound victory to celebrate. An appellate court has reversed the decision by the county board of supervisors which would have allowed a 24-lot subdivision to be built on the land.
  • By Dryw Keltz, Aug. 20, 2019

40-60 head of cattle grazing on the property earn $10 per head per month.

40-60 head of cattle grazing on the property earn $10 per head per month.

  • Hang back from the box if someone else is there

  • In the corner of the parking lot at Wynola Pizza and Bistro in Julian, is a reason local residents in the mountain community of 4,000 will never have to go hungry. Resident Heather Rowell learned of the Blessing Box idea and wanted to act. Started in Lafayetteville, Arkansas two years ago, neighbors could help neighbors with a community food pantry, anonymously. The idea works on the honor system; folks put food staples in, those in need take food out.
  • By Ken Harrison, Jan. 8, 2019

Blessing Box in front of Wynola Pizza. "Nobody can ‘steal’ something that’s free."

Blessing Box in front of Wynola Pizza. "Nobody can ‘steal’ something that’s free."

  • Cheers for badger den near Julian

  • As I glance in the passenger-side rearview mirror, a dusty plume billows behind us, brightly lit by the low morning sun. Next to me in the driver’s seat, Shannon Quigley-Raymond guides her car along winding Eagle Peak Road, southwest of Julian.
  • By A.J. Herrington, Oct. 15, 2017

Among 5000 images taken by the motion-activated camera, they got about 30 badger shots.

Among 5000 images taken by the motion-activated camera, they got about 30 badger shots.

courtesy of the San Diego River Park Foundation

  • How y'like them apples?

  • In July, I introduced readers to Brian Kenner, an orchard owner working to open a cider and perry company called Julian CiderWorks in the community of the same name. When reporting on this, I wondered if the business’ name was too close to that of already established operation, Julian Hard Cider. Kenner wondered the same thing.
  • By Brandon Hernández, Nov. 20, 2014
  • Sixty miles for a Nickel beer

  • Tom Nickel's beers make it into town periodically — he owns O'Brien's Pub, after all — but he brews Nickel Beers in small enough batches that you often need to be in the right place at the right time to find them.
  • By Ian Anderson, Jan. 5, 2016

Julian's not just about cider and pie shops these days.

Julian's not just about cider and pie shops these days.

  • Are the volunteers getting hosed?

  • Nicio Aguilera is blunt: “Nobody up here trusts the county. We don’t trust them, we don’t like them.” Aguilera, who spent 15 years fighting fires in Philadelphia and another 15 at a Carlsbad station, is one of a cadre of backcountry locals manning the front lines against what he calls a “power grab.”
  • By Moss Gropen, July 24, 2013

Drury (“Drew”) Bailey

Drury (“Drew”) Bailey

  • Julian? Who's Julian?

  • Chance and Horton’s bias sent the Baileys and Julians to the Cuyamacas. And Father Ascension was right: gold did trickle from a higher source. Back up the mountain from Coleman Creek, Mike Julian and Drew Bailey found the first quartz mine in the region. As if to sever ties with their past, they called it Warrior’s Rest.
  • By Jeff Smith, April 27, 2011
  • Jumpin' Julian, Way Back When

  • “Julian was never the hell roarin’ town commonly associated with mining camps,” wrote Dan Taylor in 1939. And that’s been pretty much the image ever since. Even so, the lure of gold magnifies human behavior, both civilized and savage.
  • By Jeff Smith, April 20, 2011

Julian Hotel

Julian Hotel

  • Julian Flap Over Wind-Test Structures

  • Strong winds of public disapproval toppled electricity-producing windmills in the Julian area before they were even built. At an August 11 meeting at Julian Town Hall, 100 area residents whipped up a hurricane of opposition to the very idea of wind-driven turbines -- on towers 300-plus feet tall and sporting blades over 100 feet long -- standing in a row down the east ridge of Volcan Mountain toward the hamlet of Banner.
  • By Ernie Grimm, Dec. 15, 2005

The trucks are hauling the wood west, down the hill to Santa Ysabel, then north on Highway 79 through Warner Springs and finally to the Corona Ranch sod farm on the east edge of Temecula.

The trucks are hauling the wood west, down the hill to Santa Ysabel, then north on Highway 79 through Warner Springs and finally to the Corona Ranch sod farm on the east edge of Temecula.

  • Log Rumors Rattle Julian

  • These days, Julian residents are seeing something that hasn't been seen in those parts for three decades: logging trucks laden with local logs growling down the mountain roads and returning empty. "Everybody in the community has seen these trucks rolling," says local naturalist Clinton Powell. "There's a big sign right on Farmer's Road that says 'Caution: Log Trucks.' "
  • By Ernie Grimm, June 26, 2003
  • Julian Waits for Disaster

  • It's a muggy 93 degrees as I steer my car up the winding, climbing driveway of Buzz Machey's property in Julian. Near the top of the drive, I swing left to avoid a ten-wheel diesel truck with its front wheels six feet in the air. Two hydraulic lifts vertically position a 45-foot drill rig mounted to the bed of the truck. Two young men, their ears plugged against the deafening racket of the working drill, stand and wait for signs that the drill has hit water.
  • By Ernie Grimm, Aug. 1, 2002

just down the hill from Machey's house, the Julian High School football field grows plush and green. "Just before noon, I drove into town, and they were watering that whole field in the midday heat."

just down the hill from Machey's house, the Julian High School football field grows plush and green. "Just before noon, I drove into town, and they were watering that whole field in the midday heat."

  • Moo Twilight

  • Cauzza's father came from Switzerland in the 1930s to work on the dairy and cattle ranch his uncles had built, first on a site southwest of Ramona, where San Diego Country Estates now lies, later in Santa Ysabel. Cauzza grew up on the Santa Ysabel cattle ranch he owns now. Two of his three sons and their children live and work on the ranch. For Cauzza, no distinctions exist among life, family, and ranching.
  • By Ernie Grimm, Sept. 27, 2001

Sonny Cauzza: "This is my brother's piece," Cauzza points to the west of Highway 79, a mile north of Santa Ysabel. "He's got about 950 acres. My piece is over on the other side of the road. I've got about 850 acres."

Sonny Cauzza: "This is my brother's piece," Cauzza points to the west of Highway 79, a mile north of Santa Ysabel. "He's got about 950 acres. My piece is over on the other side of the road. I've got about 850 acres."

  • Volcan Mountain's pesky poachers

  • Patches of week-old snow glisten in the shady spots of Don Madison's front yard. Totem poles and wood carvings stand in various states of completion. Madison, a stout man of 45 with salt-and-pepper hair and mustache, emerges from the front door of the plank-sided cabin. Dressed in black jeans, a blue-and-red pendleton, and a green baseball cap, he offers a firm handshake and directs me to the passenger seat of his white Chevy pickup.
  • By Ernie Grimm, April 22, 1999

Don Madison and Otis. “I haven’t really trained Otis to do that. It’s in his blood."

Don Madison and Otis. “I haven’t really trained Otis to do that. It’s in his blood."

  • American Primitive

  • Memorial Day 1991 is the anniversary of a deadly gold fields shootout known in the Julian back country as “The Chariot Canyon Massacre.” Five men opened fire with assault rifle, shotgun, machine pistol, hunting rifle, and target rifle in a dispute over a gold claim in the historic Chariot Canyon gold field.
  • By Hugh Crumpler, May 30, 1991

Monument at Chariot Canyon. Deputies driving Banner Grade have seen Gustav Hudson at the property and  Benjamin Haimes' Lincoln Continental.

Monument at Chariot Canyon. Deputies driving Banner Grade have seen Gustav Hudson at the property and Benjamin Haimes' Lincoln Continental.

  • Julian's Apple Survivors

  • At this time of year, the pies in Julian are made with fresh apples from Julian orchards. The Julian Pie Company gets its apples from Crown Orchards in the Farmer's Road area north of town. Apple Alley and Mom's get theirs from Apple Lane Orchards across Highway 78 from Julian High School. Apple Lane is owned by Tyler and Janet Johnson, who are new to the apple business.
  • By Ernie Grimm, Nov. 8, 2001

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