Quantcast

Alpine – coyotes, wildfires, high school worries

Alpine Beer Company, Peutz Valley, Wright's Field

The route from Alpine to Granite Hills high illustrates a hazardous stretch of highway.
  • The route from Alpine to Granite Hills high illustrates a hazardous stretch of highway.
  • Live in Alpine? Get a generator.

  • Alpine resident Bill Smith said SDGE has been “cutting power off at least once a month for the past three or so months. Not everyone can afford a generator and people who have solar panels lose the credit for the entire day. We all have wells here and can’t run the water without power.”
  • By Ana Nita, Aug. 21, 2018 Read full article
  • Alpine High School still doesn't exist

  • "Over the years, there have been accidents and several fatalities of both parents and students,” said Alpine resident Sal Casamassima. "Most recently, an Alpine student coming from Steele [Canyon High] was involved in a head-on collision with, coincidentally, one of the [Alpine School District] employees."
  • By Julie Stalmer, Feb. 5, 2018 Read full article

Five of the 15 homes lost in the Viejas fire were on Farlin Road, a short road off Alpine Boulevard.

Five of the 15 homes lost in the Viejas fire were on Farlin Road, a short road off Alpine Boulevard.

  • Rustic Firetraps

  • Further east of Alpine Boulevard, Ace points toward the fence separating the street and the freeway embankment. "Now, see the rust on the chain link here? The fire started about a mile and a half east of here in the center divide. It jumped on the other side of the freeway, it burned across that mountain up ahead, and it jumped across the freeway right down here, and jumped into Alpine. Where that fence was rusted was one of the areas that burned across the freeway."
  • By Ernie Grimm, Dec. 20, 2001 Read full article
  • Coyotes on the edge of Deercreek Canyon

  • We discussed it, though, and living out here where we do at the back edge of old Deercreek Canyon (Harbison Canyon/Alpine), nestled up at the edge of the vast expanse of scrubby bouldered hills surrounding us, living with coyotes is a part of our everyday lives. He agreed with me that they are not menacing creatures, only a beautiful part of the landscape here and that we are encroaching on their territory.
  • By Laura Cedargreen, Feb. 20, 2014 Read full article

Danielle Faught, pub manager, walking beer encyclopedia

Danielle Faught, pub manager, walking beer encyclopedia

  • Sweet Belt of Alpine

  • We swing across Alpine Boulevard and park. It’s a long, low, white-painted brick building with a shingled roof and a canvas sign in the bay window — “Alpine Beer Company.” This is where Pat McIlhenney, a retired fireman, has been making craft beers and winning the World Beer Cup again and again. Putting Alpine on the map.
  • By Ed Bedford, June 22, 2011 Read full article
  • Alpine's Secret Valley

  • Here we could raise animals and grow a garden, learn the old arts of canning, butchering, milking, and cheese-making. The '70s provided this back-earth movement, and our few neighbors, like my family, immersed themselves in it, regardless of the distance between our homes.
  • By Wendy Padilla, Sept. 20, 2007 Read full article

Wright's Field could be turned into our Balboa Park.

Wright's Field could be turned into our Balboa Park.

  • How long can Alpine stay rural?

  • Alpine occupies the 13 miles between Flinn Springs and Descanso, a mile or two north and south of I-8. Alpine has no mayor or city council, and its self-governance is limited to the 15-member Alpine Community Planning Group that meets one night each month at the Alpine Community Center on Alpine Boulevard. The planning group's decisions on such issues as zoning and land use are purely advisory
  • By Abe Opincar, Oct. 19, 2006 Read full article

“If this rezoning goes through, it will mean Alpine will be urbanized."

“If this rezoning goes through, it will mean Alpine will be urbanized."

San Diego Edition

  • Alpine — city of one million?

  • The developers claim the group’s disagreements are merely petty bickering. The ruralists, on the other hand, believe the two groups are in real conflict over Alpine’s future. In fact, many ruralists see the developers’ use of the word “bickering” as one tactic in a strategy to sabotage Alpine’s attempt at collective community planning.
  • By Jim Cohen, Nov. 8, 1973 Read full article

Share / Tools

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • AddThis
  • Email

More from SDReader

Comments

Log in to comment

Skip Ad