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North County tales

Dangerous Wildcat Canyon, creamy Fallbrook avocados, Torrey Pines Rd. bridge, west Ramona's grasslands, how is the Coaster doing?

The colonnade outside the back of the living room has been ripped out and replaced with an enormous beam.
  • The colonnade outside the back of the living room has been ripped out and replaced with an enormous beam.

Officer Gwen Goodwin: "Maybe the drivers have decided to go out and gamble at Barona Casino, and they drive the run too fast."

Officer Gwen Goodwin: "Maybe the drivers have decided to go out and gamble at Barona Casino, and they drive the run too fast."

Grisly Grinders in Wildcat Canyon

Goodwin acknowledges that Wildcat Canyon has developed a reputation for being a dangerous drive and offers this explanation. "It's a two-lane roadway, it's very windy, it's up and down. Maybe the drivers have decided to go out and gamble at Barona Casino, and they drive the run too fast because they're unfamiliar with it. And there are people that drive it every day and they still drive too fast."

By Ernie Grimm, Nov. 29, 2001 | Read full article


"I hate to admit, we don't buy a lot of avocados. Everyone in town has someone they know with a grove."

"I hate to admit, we don't buy a lot of avocados. Everyone in town has someone they know with a grove."

Creamy Flesh

"Approximately 20 percent of the [42,000] people in Fallbrook deal with avocados in some way," says Bob Leonard, executive director of Fallbrook's Chamber of Commerce. The commercial avocado industry in the United States was founded in Fallbrook when the first avocado tree was planted there in 1912. But the city's moneymaking green fruit has seen a financially stagnant year. Forty-four percent of the avocados consumed in this country are now imported, up from four percent just a decade ago.

By Barbarella Fokos, April 14, 2005 | Read full article


North bridge or “high bridge,” now owned solely by the City of Del Mar

North bridge or “high bridge,” now owned solely by the City of Del Mar

Scandal Bridge

The three lanes of Torrey Pines Road between the state reserve of the same name and Del Mar crown a half-mile sand berm separating the Pacific Ocean to the west and Los Peñasquitos lagoon to the east. Near the north end of the berm, the road narrows to two lanes as it crosses a concrete bridge erected in 1932. The bridge, about 100 yards long, spans the mouth to the lagoon. From underneath, it doesn't take a structural engineer to see it needs replacing. The 72 concrete piles holding it up are heavily weathered. Constant tidal flows have cut away at the columns so that the portion below the high tide line is thinner than above.

By Ernie Grimm, Jan. 30, 2003 | Read full article


Site 151’s Four Million Dollar Mansion

You get to Cielo from the commercial zone that's at the center of Rancho Santa Fe by driving east on Paseo Delicias, which soon becomes Del Dios Highway. The driveway into Cielo is located a few hundred yards farther east on the hilly northern side of the highway. Both "production" and custom-home sections have been designated in this community. In the production areas, three different builders have been erecting some of the priciest tract housing in San Diego County (ranging from $1.6 to $2.5 million).

By Jeannette DeWyze, July 22, 2004 | Read full article


Outside the Cagney ranch, the rest of the grassland is broken into plots as large as 1100 and 1600 acres possessed by only four or five longtime owners.

Outside the Cagney ranch, the rest of the grassland is broken into plots as large as 1100 and 1600 acres possessed by only four or five longtime owners.

Grassy Heaven

Broad, open grasslands in the topography of San Diego County are the exception to the norm, which is chaparral-covered mesas and barrancas. And most of the natural grasslands, Mission Valley for example, have been developed. Two notable exceptions are the plains northeast of Lake Henshaw and the Ramona grasslands west of the town of Ramona.

By Ernie Grimm, Dec. 18, 2003 | Read full article


Coaster, Solana Beach Station. "The Coaster is not a solution to the County's transportation problems. It's not a partial solution. It's not even a potential solution."

Coaster, Solana Beach Station. "The Coaster is not a solution to the County's transportation problems. It's not a partial solution. It's not even a potential solution."

How Is the Coaster Doing?

For nine years, the Coaster ran 100 feet from Mitchell Reiss's bedroom window in Carlsbad. Two months ago, Reiss moved from his proximity to the Poinsettia station to the South Bay "to get as far away from the Coaster as possible." The noise drove him away, as well as "other nuisances" from the trains' headlights and gathering passengers.

By Joe Deegan, June 3, 2004 | Read full article

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