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San Diego gangs: Lomas, Red Steps, Crips, Oriental Killer Boys

Plus Danny Dean Wilson of North County, Vicente, Huero, and a meditation at Holy Cross Cemetery by Junior Garcia

Speedy Claims Lomas, the Law Claims Speedy

“Me and my homeboys were hanging around the hood [neighborhood] when some of my homegirls came up and told us they wanted to jump out [the gang ritual of beating up a member who wants to leave the gang] this girl Giggles, and they wanted us to come along to protect them from the Red Steps. So me and Snoopy and Tripper got into Lalo’s red VW truck and followed the girls down to Chicano Park.”

By Rory Perry, January 19, 1989 | Read full article

Danny Dean Wilson. The front of the train caught Danny above the chest and threw him perhaps sixty yards forward.

Danny Dean Wilson. The front of the train caught Danny above the chest and threw him perhaps sixty yards forward.

Requiem For a Rebel: The last days of Danny Dean Wilson

Later that night at a party Danny and Poodle and Tim met a teen-ager who invited them to her apartment to stay for the night. Her mother had rented her a studio at 2166 Montgomery Avenue in Cardiff: one room floored mostly by a waterbed, with a kitchenette and bath, and a back door leading to a hillside cellar that seemed like the bottom of the world, a perfect place for partying.

By Joe Applegate, May 19, 1983 | Read full article

The Thursday, Feb. 26 edition of the San Diego Union listed the $45,000 bust as occurring in a house near 30th and National. Otto Square is a shopping center five blocks away.

The Thursday, Feb. 26 edition of the San Diego Union listed the $45,000 bust as occurring in a house near 30th and National. Otto Square is a shopping center five blocks away.

Lost in Logan Heights

“When the pigs found my car in TJ. I didn't have but a few bills left, so what could I do? I sold the car to some dude for fifty bucks. I thought he’d sell it back to me later but he didn't. I felt like killin’ his ass, but I figured it was some kinda poetic justice for what happened to Mac. Besides. I woulda lost it somehow anyway.” After losing his car, ’Cente says he had no choice but to straighten up.

By Steve Esmedina, March 11, 1976 | Read full article

Bam-Bam, Cookie, and Joker, demonstrating hand signals "Lomas," "26," "Chicas #1." Joker testifies that she learned about the shooting from the homeboys hanging out at Dave’s Market at 26th and Broadway.

Bam-Bam, Cookie, and Joker, demonstrating hand signals "Lomas," "26," "Chicas #1." Joker testifies that she learned about the shooting from the homeboys hanging out at Dave’s Market at 26th and Broadway.

Huero Walks

Dopey and his friends flashed Red Steps hand signs back at the occupants of the white car as it headed toward Crosby Street. Dopey goes on to tell the jury that one of his homeboys crossed the street, leaving him and Nene on the sidewalk in front of the park’s sandbox. Dopey saw the white car coming back west on National Avenue. The driver turned off the headlights. Someone stuck a gun out of the car.

By Rory Perry, July 6, 1989 | Read full article

Laotian boy flashes OKB sign. "A lot of TOC and OKB (Oriental Killer Boys) they’re relatives from Linda Vista and Chollas View area."

Laotian boy flashes OKB sign. "A lot of TOC and OKB (Oriental Killer Boys) they’re relatives from Linda Vista and Chollas View area."

Bulletproof Buddhists: The Violence Didn't Get Started Until 1989

“So these kids said, ‘Well, we’re a Crip set, too.’ So the Lao in the Southeastern Division used to call themselves the 48th Street Crips. But then the leader, when he was arrested the first time, he went to jail. He was 18, came out at the end of 1988, and he told everybody, ‘We’re no longer the 48th Street Crips.’ So something happened in jail for him. And he said, ‘We are now the Oriental Killer Boys.’"

By Frank Chin, July 27, 1995 | Read full article

Children's gravestones, Holy Cross Cemetery. Mostly, I tell this story for all the burning bad boys and girls out there, all you killers in your khakis and Impalas, all you rucas with your big hair and you dead-eyed young vatos with your little tattoos and mustaches.

Children's gravestones, Holy Cross Cemetery. Mostly, I tell this story for all the burning bad boys and girls out there, all you killers in your khakis and Impalas, all you rucas with your big hair and you dead-eyed young vatos with your little tattoos and mustaches.

Sorrow's Gravity: Loss of Innocence in National City

I tell it for those who have buried a homeboy. But mostly, I tell it for all the burning bad boys and girls out there, all you killers in your khakis and Impalas, all you rucas with your big hair and you dead-eyed young vatos with your little tattoos and mustaches. Because I wonder how many of you are carrying a Filiberto on your back. How many of you never dared tell anyone. How many of you never got payback.

By Junior Garcia, Feb. 1, 1996 | Read full article

"Being down means backing up your homies, and you’re down for backing them up. You got a reputation."

"Being down means backing up your homies, and you’re down for backing them up. You got a reputation."

Down Home: A Rap on the Wack Existence

I came late to a meeting at a homeboy’s house. A couple of dudes had already got jumped in. They were all, “Yeah, yeah, we got jumped in. You want to get jumped in?” And people were talking. “Yeah, they got jumped in.” I said, “Yeah, I want to get jumped in.” I walked through the line and I got socked up. I got up and I wanted to go again so people could look at me more.

By Rory Perry, April 18, 1991 | Read full article

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